In the studio with… Yuta Segawa
Left: Yuta Segawa portrait. Right: Yuta Segawa miniture pot in the palm of a hand.
Japanese ceramicist, Yuta Segawa, studied MA Visual Arts: Designer Maker at Camberwell College of Arts, graduating in 2015. His work focuses on the relationship between the artist’s body and the materials used during the making process. In his series Miniature Pots – sold in not just a shop – he creates a vast array of ceramic vessels that show traces of his practice and actions. He takes creation methods to their limits by experimenting with scale and unusual techniques.

Where is your studio?

My studio is in Wimbledon, South London. I’ve been there for a year now. It’s a small space but I have my own kiln and a pottery wheel in my studio.

Describe your typical day

My days are very busy; I spend most of my time working on the wheel but I also mix ingredients for the glazes, fire the kiln, and pack the finished pieces for delivery.

I regularly come up with new glaze recipes and develop new projects. If there is an art fair coming up, I will also design and make the plinth in advance.

Yuta Segawa miniture ceramic pots

What are the key stages of your design and making process?

I sketch a design in my mind, while I am working on the wheel. I use references from Chinese pottery, which I admire a lot. Other times, I actually draw it out with pencil and paper.

What is the best thing about your job?

After a series of trials and errors, I like it when I open the kiln and find very good pieces inside. Some glaze combinations deliver unexpected results which can be a pleasant surprise at times.

Do you listen to music in your studio?

No, I don’t play music in the studio as I love listening to the sound of the wheel.

Left: Yuta Segawa working in his studio. Right: Yuta Segawa mini ceramics.
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