We’re celebrating Galentine’s day with a visit to Zoë Tynan Campbell, co-founder of Girls Done Good

Founded in 2018 by designer-makers Zoë Tynan Campbell and Harriet Cox, Girls Done Good designs and sells products to raise money and awareness for amazing charitable organisations. A percentage of all proceeds go to causes that inspire, educate and empower women.

Here’s what Zoë had to say…

Can you tell us a little bit more about your business?

After graduating I launched a small design studio called Stumped Studio making and selling gifts and homewares, but I had this moment when I had a minor surgery, all the doctors and nurses kept asking me what I did and my response was basically that I make nice things. You save lives and I make nice things. It was a bit of a turning point and I realised I needed to do something with more of a positive social impact. And so Girls Done Good was born. GDG is a social enterprise where we still design nice things – the difference is that they do some good in the world too! Our products have positive messages and part of the profits support the amazing work of charities such as Bloody Good Period, The Maya Centre, Girls’ Network and Coppafeel.

What’s it like to balance a business alongside a demanding full time job?

I’m definitely someone who finds it hard to say no to offers and I thrive on being busy. It helps that Girls Done Good doesn’t feel like work and it’s great to run it with a friend, it keeps you motivated and accountable!

Can you name a few of your most inspiring creative businesses?

Bulletin is basically the US version of what we want Girls Done Good to be! It’s run by two friends and is a shop (now with multiple locations) which sells products by primarily female founded brands and helps businesses to launch! We’re hoping we’ll get close to what they’ve achieved. I also really love Milo Made ceramics and Donna Wilson who was probably the first female fronted business owner I looked up to.

Zoe Tynan-Campbell from Girls Done Good


Zoë Tynan Campbell – one half of the duo behind Girls Done Good.

Why do they inspire you?

They’re all women killing it at what they do and I’m passionate about women in business!

How do you discover businesses to inspire you?

I’m definitely guilty of entering a good old internet blackhole and I try to keep up by going to shows and exhibitions. Discovering Bulletin however was completely by chance, as Harriet, the other half of GDG, happened to walk in to the shop in NY not long after we’d launched. 

What’s it like to work with your close friend?

We work really well together and we get excited about the same things. We have a similar way of working as we don’t put too much pressure on growth and try to enjoy it. We both trained as 3D designers at opposite ends of the country but have different things we’re good at which works really well. Basically I love everything Harriet turns her hand to!

What do you think makes creative businesses special?

As a creative business you’re making a huge contribution to the economy and using creativity for the greater good. It’s a great time to be a creative business now, as customers care about the backstory behind products more than ever.

Do you think creatives naturally make good business people?

Yes but I think a lot of creatives don’t realise or acknowledge it. Being creative is basically being agile and generating ideas and making them happen. If you’re a one man band, you’re not only a maker, you’re an accountant, a runner and everything else!

What advice would you give to creatives wanting to start a business?

Just start something. Don’t think “I need 17 products before I launch.” Just start something small and see what happens!

Thanks so much to Zoë and Girls Done Good!

See products by Girls Done Good